A Mandolin Resurrection Story

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The Ides of March are under-celebrated as far as I’m concerned.  And those who are condemned to repeat history are doomed.  In honor of the Ides, I decided to plunge a couple of knives into the back of this lovely Eastman mandolin.

The customer brought it to me with a previously-repaired crack in the top, and a serious buzzing that made it unplayable.  Upon inspection, I found that the impact that had caused the crack had also loosened a tone bar inside the instrument.  I decided the best way to go about the repair was to remove the back.

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The back came off nicely but slowly.  As my friend Ron Sharp says, “There’s a whole lot of careful in that job there.”

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A man can never have too many clamps.

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Having glued down the tone bar, I shored up the previously repaired crack with some nice splints.

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And the back is ready to go back on.

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Like I said, a man can never have too many clamps.  And be grateful for adhesion.  It’s kind of what holds everything together.

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This mandolin was loud and proud.  Maybe loud enough to make a banjo player nervous.  And it’s back in the field now doing the work that mandolins were made to do.  Happy customer.  Happy Fret Boss.

 

 

 

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